printericon

Activities 2016

Setting up a complete online catalogue of all paintings by Oskar Kokoschka
Expert advisor: Walter Feilchenfeldt
IT infrastructure sponsored by Eurospider in Zurich
Eurospider 

Lecture at the University of the Third Age
8 January, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Régine Bonnefoit, Kokoschka and Switzerland
University of Neuchâtel, Hall RNO2
PDF

20 October 2015 – 7 February 2016
Exhibition Oskar Kokoschka and Alma Mahler – a tragic love affair
Musée Jenisch Vevey

Kokoschka first met Alma Mahler, the widow of the composer Gustav, on 12 April 1912 in Vienna. This was the beginning of a tragic love story that would come to an end just three years later. The exhibition will show many of the drawings and lithographs in which Kokoschka depicted all the ups and downs of their relationship, often in allegorical form. They include his illustrations to The Chinese wall (1914) by Karl Kraus, the twelve chalk lithographs Columbus in chains (1913), the Bachkantate, published in 1914, and the illustrations for his poem Allos Makar (1914). The title of this poem is an anagram of the names Alma and Oskar. In his drama Orpheus and Eurydice, written in 1916/17 and first performed in Frankfurt in 1921, Kokoschka worked through his failed relationship with Alma. Here, Alma appears as Eurydice, while Kokoschka identified himself with the mythological singer who descended into the underworld to rescue his beloved from the power of Hades.

In order to console himself over the loss of his lover, Kokoschka commissioned the Munich doll maker Hermine Moos to create a life-size doll after Alma’s likeness in July 1918. The doll was designed according to Kokoschka’s own descriptions. Although the result was a bitter disappointment to him, he used this fetish doll in several paintings and drawings.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

23 February – 29 May 2016
Exhibition Kokoschka’s travels to North Africa. An imagined Orient.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

The Fondation Oskar Kokoschka possesses two paintings that Kokoschka made in 1928 and 1929, in Algeria and in Egypt respectively: the Marabout of Témacine and Arab Women. Despite his direct contact with the locals, the artist’s travel reports describe an Orient that is more imagined than truly experienced. He pictures the Marabout as a descendant of Aisha, “the last wife of Mohammed … who with her sons had engaged in a heroic struggle to try and achieve the independence of the Berber peoples”. Postcards served as templates for him when painting his Arab Women, and these are still extant today in the artist’s archives, held by the Zentralbibliothek Zurich. In February 1965, Kokoschka travelled through Morocco for a month, and there had the opportunity to see demonstrations of the so-called “Fantasia”. This was a traditional equestrian display in the Maghreb that had been one of the best-loved motives of Orientalist painters since Delacroix. Kokoschka used his journey to create a series of 18 lithographs entitled Marrakesh. The present exhibition shows his preliminary sketches for this work, including views of camel markets, oriental architecture and scenes of the aforementioned equestrian games.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

14 June 2016 – 31 January 2017
Exhibition Early drawings of girls by Oskar Kokoschka (1908 – 1932)
Musée Jenisch Vevey

The Fondation Oskar Kokoschka holds numerous depictions of young girls from all periods of the artist’s creative life. In his reminiscences, his master student Friedrich Karl Gotsch recalled Kokoschka’s penchant for child models when teaching at the Dresden Art Academy (1919 – 1923): “These creatures were given brightly coloured cloths in which they wrapped themselves and played out masquerades. It was desired of them that they should be in constant motion, though they should not move too restlessly. We were supposed to learn to grasp what was important”. The girl in Kokoschka’s watercolour Girl with green loincloth is using just such a cloth. The exhibition is supplemented by several precious drawings from a Swiss private collection, including the Dancing semi-nude girl lifting her skirt from 1908.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

ACTIVITIES 2015

6 November 2014 – 1 February 2015

Exhibition  Oskar Kokoschka, 1915–1917: From war artist to pacifist
Musée Jenisch Vevey

On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is presenting a selection of his works that document the transformation that Kokoschka underwent between 1915 and 1917 as a result of his war experiences. On 28 July 1914 Austro-Hungary declared war on the kingdom of Serbia. Since Kokoschka was 28 years old he was liable for military service and had to reckon on being called up at any time. His friend and mentor Adolf Loos enjoyed good relations with the Army General Staff, and this allowed Kokoschka to join the most exclusive cavalry regiment of the Dual Monarchy: the Imperial-Royal Regiment of Dragoons “Archduke Josef” No. 15. On 29 August 1915 Kokoschka was badly wounded near Volodymyr-Volynsky in Ukraine. On 29 March 1916 he applied to the war press bureau to become a war artist. After Italy declared war in May 1915, the Austro-Hungarian army fought in the Isonzo Valley in what is today Slovenia. Kokoschka was sent there in mid-July 1916 and by the end of August he had drawn some 30 pictures of troop movements, gun emplacements and ruined villages, mostly in coloured chalk. After being wounded a second time, Kokoschka became a pacifist and from 1917 onwards worked on an anti-war portfolio that can be understood as a modern variant of the Grandes Misères de la guerre by Jacques Callot (1633) and of Desastres de la guerra by Goya (1810–1814).
Musée Jenisch Vevey

17 February – 17 May 2015

Exhibition  Homage to Olda Kokoschka
Musée Jenisch Vevey

To commemorate her 100th birthday, the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is holding an exhibition in honour of its founder, Olda Kokoschka. Oldriska Aloisie, who throughout her life was called Olda, was born in Prague on 3 February 1915. She first met the artist Oskar Kokoschka in her parents’ house in autumn 1934; he was almost thirty years older than her. In March 1938 Olda completed her legal studies with a doctorate at the Charles University in Prague. A few months before Hitler’s destruction of “rump” Czechoslovakia by Germany, she succeeded in getting two tickets for a flight to London. On 17 October 1938, she and Kokoschka were able to evade the Nazis by fleeing into exile in England. On 15 May 1941 they married in an air-raid shelter that was serving as a makeshift registrar’s office because Great Britain was at the time being bombed heavily by the Luftwaffe. Olda and Oskar Kokoschka moved to Villeneuve by the banks of Lake Geneva in 1953. In 1988, eight years after the death of her husband, Olda set up the “Fondation à la mémoire de Oskar Kokoschka” (“Foundation in memory of Oskar Kokoschka”), and chose to situate it in the town of Vevey, just a few miles from her home. She donated to the Fondation all the pictures that she had at her disposal and, right up to her death, she continued to augment its collection through further acquisitions and gifts. She died in Montreux on 22 June 2004. At this exhibition, the Fondation will show the Double portrait of Olda and Oskar Kokoschka, painted in 1963, which according to Olda Kokoschka’s wishes has been held by the Museum der Moderne Rupertinum in Salzburg since 1976. The exhibition will also feature a series of nine crayon drawings from the artist’s years in Prague (1934–1938) and several late watercolours of Olda Kokoschka, painted by her husband.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

26 May – 4 October 2015

Exhibition The dreaming boys
Musée Jenisch Vevey

In October 1907, Kokoschka wrote his first poetic work, The dreaming boys, which is regarded as a central work in secessionist book design and a landmark in the poetry of early Expressionism. The first page of the book features a dedication to Klimt, who had helped launch Kokoschka’s artistic career. The poem comprises a disjointed series of dreams and images, reminiscent of fairy tales, that Kokoschka illustrated with eight colour lithographs between November 1907 and January 1908. The roughly two hundred lines of the poem are printed to the right of the lithographs. There is no punctuation and the text is in lower case letters throughout. People, anthropomorphic plants, exotic birds, lakes, islands, meadows and ships illustrate the verses in vibrant colours. The angular contours of the figures already signal a turning away from Viennese art nouveau and the beginnings of Expressionism. This work was commissioned by Fritz Waerndorfer, the director of the Wiener Werkstätte (the “Viennese workshops”) and was actually supposed to have been a fairy-tale book for children. Instead, the result was what the poet Albert Ehrenstein once called “Kokoschka’s puberty picture book”. The poem describes in the first person the awakening of sexuality in a boy at puberty, whose fears and hesitant approaches to the opposite sex are expressed in dreams and metaphors.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

20 October 2015 – 31 January 2016

Exhibition Oskar Kokoschka and Alma Mahler – a tragic love affair
Musée Jenisch Vevey

Kokoschka first met Alma Mahler, the widow of the composer Gustav, on 12 April 1912 in Vienna. This was the beginning of a tragic love story that would come to an end just three years later. The exhibition will show many of the drawings and lithographs in which Kokoschka depicted all the ups and downs of their relationship, often in allegorical form. They include his illustrations to The Chinese wall (1914) by Karl Kraus, the twelve chalk lithographs Columbus in chains (1913), the Bachkantate, published in 1914, and the illustrations for his poem Allos Makar (1914). The title of this poem is an anagram of the names Alma and Oskar. In his drama Orpheus and Eurydice, written in 1916/17 and first performed in Frankfurt in 1921, Kokoschka worked through his failed relationship with Alma. Here, Alma appears as Eurydice, while Kokoschka identified himself with the mythological singer who descended into the underworld to rescue his beloved from the power of Hades.

In order to console himself over the loss of his lover, Kokoschka commissioned the Munich doll maker Hermine Moos to create a life-size doll after Alma’s likeness in July 1918. The doll was designed according to Kokoschka’s own descriptions. Although the result was a bitter disappointment to him, he used this fetish doll in several paintings and drawings. Kokoschka subsequently destroyed it, but in 2008 the Swiss artist Denis Savary had it made anew, based on photographs.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

ACTIVITIES 2014

1 December 2013 – 23 March 2014

Exhibition Still lives by Oskar Kokoschka – Watercolours and crayon drawings in the Musée Jenisch, Vevey

This exhibition features a selection of the most beautiful still lives from the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka. A year after fleeing to London to escape the Nazis (1938), a lack of models prompted Kokoschka to begin painting watercolours of flowers. During the Second World War he undertook numerous trips through Scotland and Wales, armed with a folder containing crayons and sketchbooks. He drew dead fish by the seashore, the prey of hunters in the fields, and still lives of fruit. The highpoint of this exhibition is the oil painting Flowers in a vase from 1959, which the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka was able to acquire in 2013.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

31 March – 29 June 2014

Exhibition “Homage to Hellas”: Views of Kokoschka’s round trip through Greece in 1961

Between 1 October and 24 November 1961, Oskar Kokoschka went on a journey through Greece that took him to Athens, Delphi, Olympia, Sparta, Cape Sounion and Aegina. Kokoschka made numerous drawings during his journey, and these formed the basis of 26 chalk lithographs printed by Hans Christians in Hamburg in 1964, accompanied by texts from Classical authors. They show views of temples in Athens, Delphi, Aegina and Olympia and sculptures and tomb reliefs from the National Archaeological Museum and the Acropolis Museum in Athens. In his autobiography, published in 1971, Kokoschka wrote, looking back, that “Greece is for all of us an ideal like the Garden of Eden. Why? Perhaps because it was there that man realised best what it is to be human”.
In the same room, the photographer Volker Hagendorf will show photographs of Kokoschka that were taken in 1964 during the opening of an exhibition of these lithographs that was held in the Galerie Tangente in Freiburg im Breisgau.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

2 June – 31 October
The Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is partner of the exhibition:
„Extraausgabee –!“ Die Medien und der Krieg 1914 –1918
An exhibition about the activities of the war press bureau during World War I,
organized by the Federal Chancellery and the Austrian State Archives.
Place of the exhibition: Palais Porcia, Herrengasse 23, 1010 Vienna
Catalogue of the exhibition: Untergang einer Welt. Der große Krieg 1914-1918 in Photographien und Texten, ed. by Wolfgang Maderthaner and Michael Hochedlinger, Vienna, 2013

7 July – 7 September 2014

Exhibition Drawings by Kokoschka from Swiss private collections

After settling in Switzerland in 1953, Kokoschka found friends, patrons and clients there who collected his works over the years. This exhibition shows superb drawings from Swiss private collections, including works from the 1920s and ’30s that have never before been seen in public.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

13 September – 1 November 2014

Exhibition Oskar Kokoschka as photographed by Erling Mandelmann

As part of the “Images” photography festival held every two years in Vevey, the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is organising an exhibition of photographs of Kokoschka in collaboration with the photographer Erling Mandelmann, who was born in Copenhagen in 1935. Mandelmann went in and out of Kokoschka’s house for years. He was one of the artist’s favourite photographers, as we can see from the many photos he made of Kokoschka and from a letter of recommendation that the latter wrote in 1963 to the Swiss painter, art critic and writer Walter Kern. Kokoschka asked Kern to publish photos by Mandelmann in the Swiss monthly magazine Das Werk: “There is a young Danish photographer, Erling Mandelmann, whom I recommend warmly to you; it would be very deserving for him to get a recommendation in ‘Werk’, accompanied by examples of his work, in which technical means support a truly vibrant imagination”.
Erling Mandelmann

6 November 2014 – 2 February 2015

Exhibition Oskar Kokoschka, 1915–1917: From war artist to pacifist

On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is presenting a selection of his works that document the transformation that Kokoschka underwent between 1915 and 1917 as a result of his war experiences. On 28 July 1914 Austro-Hungary declared war on the kingdom of Serbia. Since Kokoschka was 28 years old he was liable for military service and had to reckon on being called up at any time. His friend and mentor Adolf Loos enjoyed good relations with the Army General Staff, and this allowed Kokoschka to join the most exclusive cavalry regiment of the Dual Monarchy: the Imperial-Royal Regiment of Dragoons “Archduke Josef” No. 15. On 29 August 1915 Kokoschka was badly wounded near Volodymyr-Volynsky in Ukraine. On 29 March 1916 he applied to the war press bureau to become a war artist. After Italy declared war in May 1915, the Austro-Hungarian army fought in the Isonzo Valley in what is today Slovenia. Kokoschka was sent there in mid-July 1916 and by the end of August he had drawn some 30 pictures of troop movements, gun emplacements and ruined villages, mostly in coloured chalk. After being wounded a second time, Kokoschka became a pacifist and from 1917 onwards worked on an anti-war portfolio that can be understood as a modern variant of the Grandes Misères de la guerre by Jacques Callot (1633) and of Desastres de la guerra by Goya (1810–1814).
Musée Jenisch Vevey

Activities 2013

1 March – 31 May 2013

Exhibition Kokoschka’s “Bach Cantata” in pictures and music at the Musée Jenisch Vevey

The Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year with Kokoschka’s favourite Bach cantata, O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, which visitors can experience in both pictures and music. Busoni’s pupil Leo Kestenberg played and explained the work to Kokoschka and thereby helped inspire him to the series of lithographs entitled O Ewigkeit – Du Donnerwort, Bachkantate (‘O eternity, thou word of thunder, Bach cantata’) that was published in Berlin by Fritz Gurlitt in 1916/17. This work is one of the highpoints of Expressionist graphic art, and in it Kokoschka endeavours to come to terms with his crisis-ridden relationship with Alma Mahler. Over the course of eleven chalk lithographs he represents in pictures both the text and Bach’s music for it. The cantata comprises a dialogue between two voices: a tenor and an alto, of whom the former represents fear, the latter hope. The artist transformed the cantata into an autobiographical drama in which he gives expression to his own fears and hopes. He gives faces to the two voices: the tenor is his own, while the alto is Alma. Their figures are made to correspond – both individually and as a couple – to the solos and duets of the music. The artist underlines the autobiographical character of the Bach cantata by opening his series of lithographs with a self-portrait. The drama ends with a depiction of the Pièta in which his own corpse rests in the lap of his beloved. There are headphones in the exhibition hall to enable the visitor to hear the Bach cantata while looking at the pictures.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

4 May – 29 September 2013

Exhibition Oskar Kokoschka visits Rolf Gérard – A posthumous reunion of two artists at the Fondazione Rolf Gérard, Ascona

The two artists Rolf Gérard and Oskar Kokoschka first met seventy years ago in London. Kokoschka was 57 years old at the time and an internationally celebrated artist, so his relationship with Gérard – his junior by 23 years – was that of an honoured master and an inquisitive student.

In old age, Gérard recalled his first encounter with Kokoschka, which he situated in 1943/44: ‘I met Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980) in the midst of the war. He was in the same situation as I, in other words without any papers, but he was a world-famous man. He influenced me in painting watercolours without a pencil, without any preparatory drawing. He was a wonderful human being from whom I was able to learn so much’. In the year 1944 Gérard had the opportunity to make two portraits of Kokoschka in the latter’s London studio in Park Lane, and both are shown in our exhibition.

The two artists who are brought together again in this exhibition had lives that were so full of parallels and intersection points that the idea of placing them side by side is well-nigh compelling. Both Gérard and Kokoschka lived well into old age and thus experienced a whole century of art history; both possessed a great talent for capturing succinctly in a portrait the character traits of their fellow men; both traversed the world in the course of numerous journeys; and both received British citizenship in 1947, yet spent their final years in Switzerland. They both mixed with famous personalities, and besides their paintings they also designed stage sets and costumes; and both remained faithful to representational art after the Second World War. At times, their circles included the same men, such as Max Liebermann, Wilhelm Furtwängler and Rudolf Khametovich Nureyev. In this exhibition, works by Kokoschka are contrasted with those of Gérard so that a dialogue results between them.
Fondazione Rolf Gérard

6 June – 1 December 2013

Exhibition Masterworks from the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka at the Musée Jenisch Vevey
Vernissage of the exhibition: 6 June, 18:30 pm

 

The Fondation Oskar Kokoschka is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year with an exhibition of the most beautiful paintings in its collection. The choice of works on display allows us to look back over all the artist’s creative phases, from his beginnings as a student at the Vienna School of Decorative Arts in 1906 to the last years of his life.
These masterpieces include extremely rare works such as the Madonna of Lassing (1906), his first painting with a religious theme; the Hungarian Landscape (1908), his earliest known landscape; paintings made in 1928/29 during his journey to North Africa; and the earliest portrait of his future wife, Olda. It was Olda Kokoschka who set up the ‘Fondation à la mémoire de Oskar Kokoschka’ in 1988. She endowed the Foundation with all the pictures that were at her disposal and until her death continued to expand its collections by means of further purchases. It is thanks to her that the Foundation today possesses the world’s largest collection of Kokoschka’s works.
In the past 25 years, the Foundation has realized numerous publications and exhibitions, both in Switzerland and abroad. Since June 2012 it has had a permanent exhibition hall at its disposal in the Musée Jenisch in Vevey.

Musée Jenisch Vevey

26 June 2013, 11:00 to 12:45

Symposium: Place, Nation, and Politics in Oskar Kokoschka’s Art, Writings, and Career, 1934-1953
Amsterdam – Binnengasthuis 203
Conference_Program_2013 [pdf]

Organized by Keith Holz, Associate Professor, Art History, PhD, Northwestern University. The symposium is part of the 20th International Conference of Europeanists, Annual Conference of Columbia University’s Council for European Studies (CES), University of Amsterdam, 25 - 27 June 2013

Bernadette Reinhold, Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien, Kunstsammlung und Archiv
“You Have Been Lost for the Home Country”: Kokoschka and Austrian Cultural Policy After 1945

Agnes Tieze, Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie Regensburg
Kokoschka and the Art Scene in Prague

Régine Bonnefoit, Institut d’histoire de l’art et de muséologie, Université de Neuchâtel, Fondation Oskar Kokoschka, Vevey
Oskar Kokoschka: Portraitist of the Powerful

Anna Müller-Härlin, Ph.D., Independent Scholar, Berlin, Allemagne
A European friendship: Oskar Kokoschka and his English collector Edward Beddington-Behrens

12 September 2013, 19:00

Lecture in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka, Vevey
By Régine Bonnefoit, Curator of the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka at the Musée Jenisch Vevey and Professor for Contemporary Art at the University of Neuchâtel
Musée Jenisch Vevey

1 December 201323 March 2014
Exhibition Still lives by Oskar Kokoschka – Watercolours and crayon drawings in the Musée Jenisch, Vevey

This exhibition features a selection of the most beautiful still lives from the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka. A year after fleeing to London to escape the Nazis (1938), a lack of models prompted Kokoschka to begin painting watercolours of flowers. During the Second World War he undertook numerous trips through Scotland and Wales, armed with a folder containing crayons and sketchbooks. He drew dead fish by the seashore, the prey of hunters in the fields, and still lives of fruit. The highpoint of this exhibition is the oil painting Flowers in a vase from 1959, which the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka was able to acquire in 2013.

ACTIVITIES 2012

Support for the database created by the research group ‘Entartete Kunst’ (‘Degenerate art’) of the Art History Institute at the Free University in Berlin, which also includes information on those of Oskar Kokoschka’s works that were seized by the National Socialists in 1937 as part of their actions against ‘degenerate art’.
Research group "Degenerate art"

3 December 2011 – 19 February 2012

Karl Friedrich Gotsch. The Second Expressionist Generation. Exhibition by the Artvera’s Gallery in Geneva. Article in the exhibition catalogue by the curator of the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka: Régine Bonnefoit, ‘Friedrich Karl Gotsch – “The wind is not behind the sails of our kind”’, in: Karl Friedrich Gotsch, The second expressionist generation, ed. Sofia Komarova. Milan 2011, pp. 16-31.
Gallery Artvera's in Geneva

13 March – 10 June 2012

Der Sturm, Zentrum der Avantgarde (‘Der Sturm. Centre of the Avantgarde’), an exhibition by the Von der Heydt Museum in Wuppertal. Article in the exhibition catalogue by the curator of the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka: Régine Bonnefoit, ‘Kokoschkas Sturm-Jahre (1910-1916) – Vom Wiener “Oberwildling” zur Berliner “Primadonna”’, in: Der Sturm, ed. Andrea von Hülsen-Esch, Gerhard Finckh, Von der Heydt-Museum Wuppertal. Bönen 2012, pp. 269-284.
Von der Heydt-Museum in Wuppertal 

23 June 2012

Inauguration of the new Kokoschka Hall in the freshly renovated Musée Jenisch in Vevey.
Musée Jenisch Vevey

23 June – 28 October 2012

Exhibition Chef-d’œuvre de la Fondation Oskar Kokoschka (‘Masterworks from the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka’) in the Musée Jenisch in Vevey.
Musée Jenisch Vevey 

3 November 2012 – 2 February 2013

Exhibition Le regard d’Oskar Kokoschka sur l’Antiquité (‘Oskar Kokoschka’s View of Antiquity’) in the Musée Jenisch in Vevey:

Kokoschka’s artistic and literary oeuvre is testament to an intensive, lifelong engagement with Classical Antiquity. His earliest drama, Mörder, Hoffnung der Frauen (Murderer, hope of women, 1909) includes dramatic elements from the Oresteia by Aeschylus and from Kleist’s Penthesilea. In the artist’s late work, themes from ancient mythology, history and literature finally predominate. Between 1961 and 1972 he made lithographs of views of Delphi, the Acropolis in Athens, Aegina and Olympus under the programmatic title Bekenntnis zu Hellas (‘Homage to Hellas’); he also made illustrations for the Odyssey, The Frogs by Aristophanes, Penthesilea after the tragedy by Heinrich von Kleist, and The Trojan Women by Euripides. In 1929 he travelled through Greece and the Mediterranean region for the first time. Between 1956 and 1973 there followed eight further journeys to the most important centres of Antiquity in Greece, southern Italy, North Africa and Asia Minor. He also made visits to famous collections of artefacts from Classical Antiquity in Munich, Paris (the Louvre), London (the British Museum) and Boston (the Museum of Fine Arts). During these travels and museum visits, the artist filled 23 sketch books with coloured pencil drawings of ancient monuments. After finally settling in Villeneuve in 1953, the artist began to make a small collection of objects from Antiquity (vases, fragments of marble statues, coins) of which several particularly valuable pieces are to be seen in the exhibition. The individual items of his collection served as objects of study to him and are in some cases to be found again in his works.
Musée Jenisch Vevey 

Activities 2011

4 September 2011

Last guided tour by Régine Bonnefoit of the exhibition Oskar Kokoschka – Wunderkammer / Cabinet de Curiosités, which ends the same day in the Musée des Beaux-Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds

28 July 2011

Guided tour by Régine Bonnefoit of the exhibition Oskar Kokoschka – Wunderkammer / Cabinet de Curiosités in the Musée des Beaux-Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds, for the Friends of the Musée Jenisch

7 July 2011

Lecture by Régine Bonnefoit in the Musée des Beaux-Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds on Kokoschka’s activities as a stage designer for famous opera productions

27 May 2011

Guided tour by Régine Bonnefoit of the exhibition Oskar Kokoschka – Wunderkammer / Cabinet de Curiosités in the Musée des Beaux-Arts of La Chaux-de-Fonds, for the students of the Institut d’histoire de l’art et de muséologie (Institute for the History of Art and Museology), University of Neuchâtel

15 May 2011

Guided tour by Régine Bonnefoit through the exhibition Oskar Kokoschka – Wunderkammer / Cabinet de Curiosités in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in La Chaux-de-Fonds

14 May 2011

Opening of the exhibition Oskar Kokoschka – Wunderkammer / Cabinet de Curiosités in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in La Chaux-de-Fonds

9 April 2011

Publication of the article ‘Was ich nur erträumen, malen und dichten kann’ – Oskar Kokoschka und die Schweiz – oder: Die Schweiz und Kokoschka? by Régine Bonnefoit in the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, No. 84, p. 67

26 March 2011

In the Martin-von-Wagner Museum in Würzburg: As part of the 31st Congress of German Art Historians, Régine Bonnefoit gave a paper about a crayon drawing that Kokoschka drew in 1961 in the Museum of Delphi, after the Southern Frieze of the Siphnian Treasury. In 1962, Kokoschka gave the drawing as a gift to the archaeologist Erika Simon, who was present at the lecture in Würzburg and afterwards offered her reminiscences of the artist. In order to illustrate the typical characteristics of Kokoschka’s drawing style, Ms Bonnefoit showed several crayons that had belonged to the artist and that are held by the Fondation Oskar Kokoschka. The artist always sharpened his crayons with a knife, which meant that the leads in them had a mixture of broad surfaces and fine burrs. By turning the crayons while drawing, Kokoschka was able to vary the width of his drawing strokes at will.